TheEEStory.com

News, Reviews and Discussion of EEStor Inc.
201 Posts
 
Thu, 20 Oct 2011, 10:13am BioFuels - we owe it to our Military »
EiEiO
EExpert
Mr
Registered: Jun, 2009
Last visit: Tue, 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 201

Interesting article from Gen Clark:

http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2011/10/19/ou...

From Article:
Consider this: Every time the price of a barrel of imported oil rises one dollar, it costs the Navy $31 million in increased fuel costs. The result is that the military must run fewer operations and complete fewer training exercises.

Our nation imagines itself the most free and secure in the world, yet this statistic clearly identifies America’s reliance on foreign oil as a significant threat to our economy and national security.

We can no longer afford to allow a handful of countries—many controlled by dictators and strongmen—to exert this kind of influence over our military or our economy.

As Navy Secretary Ray Mabus recently stated at a biofuels conference in Mississippi, “We would never allow some of these countries we buy fuel from to build our ships, to build our aircraft, to build our ground vehicles, but we give them a say in whether our ships sail, our aircraft fly, our ground vehicles operate.”

That is why the U.S. Departments of Agriculture, Energy and Navy are partnering with the private sector to invest up to $510 million during the next three years to produce home-grown, advanced biofuels to power military and commercial transportation.

I would hope EEStor and the EESU would have a role to play as well - if their partnership with Lockheed Martin can prove out.

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Tue, 18 Oct 2011, 8:34pm Did "The Matrix" get it right? »
EiEiO
EExpert
Mr
Registered: Jun, 2009
Last visit: Tue, 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 201

Daniel R Plante wrote:


EiEiO, damn that is hilarious :)

Good thing Tec is a good sport.

Tec seems like a good sport - good to have some yin with the yang on this site...

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Mon, 17 Oct 2011, 4:46pm Did "The Matrix" get it right? »
EiEiO
EExpert
Mr
Registered: Jun, 2009
Last visit: Tue, 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 201

Human Body - to create its own electricity...

Very interesting article...of course - there is the spin-off of bio-powered fuel cells.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-15305579

Do you believe in the EEStory?

"Tec - Let me tell you why you're here. You're here because you know something. What you know, you can't explain, but you feel it. You've felt it your entire life, that there's something wrong with the world. You don't know what it is, but it's there, like a splinter in your mind, driving you mad. It is this feeling that has brought you to me. Do you know what I'm talking about? The EEStory is everywhere. It is all around us. Even now, in this very room. You can see it when you look out your window or when you turn on your television. You can feel it when you go to work... when you go to church... when you pay your taxes. It is the world that has been pulled over your eyes to blind you from the truth." - Morpheus

Tec: What is the Truth?

"That you are a slave, Tec. Like everyone else you were born into bondage. Into a prison that you cannot taste or see or touch. A prison for your mind." - Morpheus

Believe in the EEStory....

Last edited Mon, 17 Oct 2011, 5:02pm by EiEiO

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Wed, 21 Sep 2011, 11:28pm Microbial Electrolysis Cell (MEC) »
EiEiO
EExpert
Mr
Registered: Jun, 2009
Last visit: Tue, 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 201

How about water, microbes, and some nutrients - and you get Hydrogen?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-1...

Lens Scale - 5

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Wed, 21 Sep 2011, 11:06pm ULTRACAPACITORS ARTICLE and Joel Schindall's work »
EiEiO
EExpert
Mr
Registered: Jun, 2009
Last visit: Tue, 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 201

Nice explanation of Caps...much appreciated!

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Wed, 21 Sep 2011, 10:58pm Japanese Tech Could Allow Electric Vehicles To Drive Unlimited Distances »
EiEiO
EExpert
Mr
Registered: Jun, 2009
Last visit: Tue, 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 201

An interesting Idea - may not go anywhere, but still nice to see people looking at automobile electrification from so many different angles. Hopefully it will be relatively soon (25 years?) when the concept of running a car on gasoline or diesel seems as outdated as lighting your house with Kerosene or Whale Oil lamps.

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Sat, 17 Sep 2011, 11:46am 'Wind Lens' = 3x More efficient wind power - cheaper than nuclear? »
EiEiO
EExpert
Mr
Registered: Jun, 2009
Last visit: Tue, 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 201

Interesting article on more efficient wind technology...

http://www.mnn.com/green-tech/research-innovati...

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Sat, 17 Sep 2011, 11:28am 'Jelly' Batteries - safer, lighter, cheaper? »
EiEiO
EExpert
Mr
Registered: Jun, 2009
Last visit: Tue, 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 201

Interesting article - uncertain if it had been posted before:

http://www.mnn.com/green-tech/research-innovati...

The concept is that by putting Lithium Ion in a jelly like polymer, it is safer and lighter, and moves to a 'solid state' storage concept. I recall that someone on this forum suggested that EEStor might be pursuing a similar approach? I did a search but could not find it.

Lens Scale: 5 - but would like some tangible evidence soon. Too many years and counting....

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Mon, 15 Aug 2011, 11:26pm What makes the best Bio-fuel? »
EiEiO
EExpert
Mr
Registered: Jun, 2009
Last visit: Tue, 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 201

jambon wrote:

This Article starts to look beyond the "gee that is cool" aspect of Bio-fuels.

Interesting article. For those of you who are interested - you can sign up for a free daily of Biofuels Digest: http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/

They follow all biofuels developments, and even rank the most important companies and technologies on an annual basis.

Camelina anyone? Jatropha? Algae? Biomass from crop residue or even garbage? There is a company or companies working on every angle. Hopefully some of them pan out and can be cost competitive. Even with an EESU, we will still need liquid fuels for aviation, heavy machinery (although CNG is showing a lot of promise for the latter), and even marine applications.

I would still like to drive an EESU powered car in about 5-10 years....I still have hope.

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Wed, 10 Aug 2011, 6:37pm When was the last real news »
EiEiO
EExpert
Mr
Registered: Jun, 2009
Last visit: Tue, 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 201

ONeil wrote:

Sorry, can't resist a good straight line.

cechilders wrote:

OMG! two years for any real news and I am still here. I am dumber than I thought

... but not dumber than we thought you were!

apologies

Some of us come here...with the hope that EEStor finally cracks the code...kinda like looking repeatedly into an empty refrigerator, knowing that it is empty, but you look again, in case of miracles.

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Tue, 02 Aug 2011, 8:21pm Joule Unlimited gets Patents »
EiEiO
EExpert
Mr
Registered: Jun, 2009
Last visit: Tue, 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 201

Joule is granted patents for their process to convert CO2, Sunlight, and Water to Ethanol using engineered organisms - without Biomass.

http://www.jouleunlimited.com/news/2011/joule-a...

Certainly plenty of potential here. If EEStor cannot get their product out the door, then maybe growing your own fuel is the next best thing - assuming batteries can't cut the mustard

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Sun, 17 Jul 2011, 7:42pm Couple of Thorium Developments »
EiEiO
EExpert
Mr
Registered: Jun, 2009
Last visit: Tue, 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 201

Robw wrote:

Yup, lots of activity on the Thorium front, just as I said would happen a couple of years ago.

I still think China will get there first, but good to see these developments in the U.S. also.

In case anyone has forgotten, or is to lazy to click on my signature link, once again, here are just some of the benefits of LFTR's...

Nuclear power isn’t the problem.

The problem is with the reactors we’ve been using to produce it. If the reactors at Fukushima had been Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactors (LFTRs) they wouldn’t have had a disaster on their hands.

1. Liquid-fuel reactor technology was successfully developed at Oak Ridge National Labs in the 1960s. Although the test reactor worked flawlessly, the project was shelved, a victim of Cold War strategy. But LFTRs have been gathering a lot of attention lately, particularly since the tragic events in Japan.

2. A LFTR is a completely different type of reactor. For one thing, it can’t melt down. It’s physically impossible. And since it’s air-cooled, it doesn’t have to be located near the shore. It can even be placed in an underground vault. A tsunami would roll right over it, like a truck over a manhole cover.

3. Imagine a kettle of lava that never boils. A LFTR uses liquid fuel⎯nuclear material dissolved in molten fluoride salt. Conventional reactors are atomic pressure cookers, using solid fuel rods to super-heat water. That means the constant danger of high-pressure ruptures and steam leaks. But liquid fuel can always expand and cool off.

4. LFTRs don’t even use water. Instead, they heat a common gas like CO2 to spin a turbine for generating power. So if a LFTR does leak, it’s not a catastrophe. Just like lava, the molten salt immediately cools off, quickly becoming an inert lump of rock.

5. LFTRs burn Thorium, a mildly radioactive material as common as tin and found all over the world. We’ve already mined enough raw Thorium to power the country for 400 years. It’s the waste at our Rare Earth Element mines.

6. LFTRs consume fuel so efficiently that they can even use the spent fuel from other reactors, while producing a miniscule amount of waste themselves. In fact, the waste from a LFTR is virtually harmless in just 300 years. (No, that’s not a typo.) Yucca Mountain is obsolete. So are Uranium reactors.

7. LFTR technology has been sitting on the shelf at Oak Ridge for over forty years. But now the manuals are dusted off, and a dedicated group of nuclear industry outsiders is ready to build another test reactor and give it a go.

Will it work? If it doesn’t, we’ll have one more reactor to retire. But if it does work(and there is every reason to believe that it will)the LFTR will launch a new American paradigm of clean, cheap, safe and abundant energy.

Let’s build one and see!

Robw - Great Summary. Thanks!

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Thu, 07 Jul 2011, 10:20pm New discovery will end rare earts mineral shortage »
EiEiO
EExpert
Mr
Registered: Jun, 2009
Last visit: Tue, 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 201

The folks from Agora Financial have a few comments on this announcement:

http://5minforecast.agorafinancial.com/waiting-...

“I’ll wait for the giant squid and the prehistoric monsters,” says the CEO of a Canadian-listed rare earths firm, speaking anonymously to Reuters, “that will come out of the bottom of the sea first before we see any rare earths.”

Cranky, yes. But also talking his book.

Considering the history of extracting mineral and energy wealth from underwater, any squid sightings are liable to be far out in the future…

•Brazil’s offshore Tupi oil discovery involves drilling through a more shallow depth of water — 7,000 feet — plus 10,000 feet of sand and rocks, and another 6,600 feet of salt. Drilling this field is an unprecedented undertaking: Discovered in 2006, production began in 2010. Reaching peak production of 200,000 barrels a day could take another 10-15 years
•Canada’s Nautilus Minerals has spent years trying to develop an underwater gold-copper project off the coast of Papua New Guinea. Shares of the company can be had today for about $2.60 each — the same price they went for in early 2008
•Diamond miners have met with some success off the coast of Namibia, in southwest Africa.
“This underwater thing may or may not play out,” comments our own Byron King, who, as you know, has been on both the deep-water drilling and rare earth beat. “We’re just looking at the warm-ups. Haven’t seen the first real pitch. Lots of innings ahead.

“Even if true, it’ll take many years to turn underwater rare earths into a commercial business. It’s been 40 years or so since people discovered manganese nodules on the seafloor, and there’s no commercial mining.

“Producers are so desperate to find a way out from under the Chinese monopoly that they’ll latch onto almost any alternative idea.”

In other words, underwater rare earths are not a game-changer… certainly not in the immediate future. At least the Japanese gentleman is excited.

Alas, the race goes on — the race to be first into production outside China.

End of Quote...

Bout sums it up I suppose.

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Wed, 29 Jun 2011, 5:48pm What ever happened to the Air Cars? »
EiEiO
EExpert
Mr
Registered: Jun, 2009
Last visit: Tue, 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 201

It looks like Zero Pollution Motors fell off the grid...

I guess the only way an air car could be 'green' is if the compressor was run off of solar or some other green energy. Interesting concept, however.
http://www.greenoptions.com/wiki/air-car-introd...

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Wed, 22 Jun 2011, 1:50pm Researchers getting closer to 'everlasting battery' »
EiEiO
EExpert
Mr
Registered: Jun, 2009
Last visit: Tue, 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 201

Very interesting....Just imagine what things will be like in 20-30 years...I might actually be picking up my grandkids in an EESU powered car!

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